Ann Weber elevates discarded cardboard boxes and clips to new heights in flowing sculptures—tremendous

art

#Ann Weber
#Cardboard
#paper
# Recycling
#sculpture

January 12, 2023

Kate Mothis

Abstract sculpture made from discarded cardboard.

“You Don’t Need a Weatherman to Know Which Way the Wind Blows” (2020) Paperboard, staples, polyurethane, 101″ x 44″ x 20″. Photo by Ray Carofano

An embodiment of the possibilities of combining unassuming materials with a good dose of resourcefulness, Ann WeberMonumental sculptures find their beginnings in discarded cardboard boxes. The San Pedro, California-based artist has drawn on her training in ceramics to focus on everyday materials, initially inspired by architect Frank Gehry. Cardboard chairs, which transformed heavy utilitarian paper into functional, structurally sound and visually appealing objects. Weber echoed a similar intent when it decided to do away with the inherently cumbersome process and weight of clay in exchange for a lightweight material that could be scaled up.

The artist scours the neighborhoods of Los Angeles in search of boxes, paying special attention to those with painted surfaces; She carefully studies the colors of graphics and texts and integrates them into the overall composition of each work. In the studio, I started by building a production organ with larger pieces of cardboard to create the silhouette. You then apply layers of strips cut from the other boxes and staple them in place in a tight, repeating pattern.

As the figures bulge, bulge, and tower overhead, the artist does not wish to obscure the omnipresent material; Instead, Weber invites the viewer to consider the material in a way they might not otherwise, saying, “Paperboard has taken on a more complex meaning in the 21st century with the hyper-capitalist ubiquity of supercharged materials.” Paper accounts for more than quarter of waste in landfills globally. She continues, “The sculptures can be seen as a critique of contemporary consumer culture, but that is not my only goal.” “I was infused with a psychological component that is not entirely representational or abstract, but something in between.”

Weber recently wrapped up a major exhibition at Wönzimer Gallery In Los Angeles. Explore more of her work Instagram Which website.

Abstract sculpture made from discarded cardboard.

Found “You’re My Butterfly” (2012), stapler and polyurethane cardboard, 88″ x 30″ x 20″ and 88″ x 36″ x 23″. Photo by Sybila Savage

Abstract sculptures made from discarded cardboard.

Left: The artist’s studio. Right: “Approximately 16, 15, and 1/2″ (2002), found paperboard, staples, polyurethane, and steel base, 182″ x 48″ x 49″ and 177″ x 38″ x 38”. Photo by M. Lee Fatherree

A series of abstract sculptures made from discarded cardboard.

“Gothic on Grand” (2018), found stapler and polyurethane cardboard, 98 x 166 x 14 inches. Photo by Ray Caravano

Abstract wall sculpture made from recycled cardboard.

Found in “The Happiest Days of Our Lives” (2018), stapler and polyurethane cardboard, 96 x 124 x 10 inches. Photo by Ray Carofano

Abstract sculpture on a base made of discarded cardboard.

“Hallelujah” (2016), found paperboard, staples and polyurethane, 30 x 46 x 10 inches. Photo by Ray Carofano

Abstract sculpture with yellow lines made from discarded cardboard.

“Pedro Boogie Woogie” (2019), cardboard, staples, and polyurethane, 104″ x 48″ x 28″. Photo by Ray Carofano

Display an installation in a gallery space of abstract sculptures made from discarded cardboard.

Installation show at Dolby Chadwick Gallery, San Francisco (2012). Photo by Sybila Savage

Ann Weber, artist, poses with a series of white, abstract sculptures made from discarded cardboard.

#Ann Weber
#Cardboard
#paper
# Recycling
#sculpture

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