The High Point Police Department talks about protecting the mental health of officers when responding to difficult scenes

Several High Point police officers responded to Saturday’s incident in which a High Point father shot and killed his wife and three children before turning the gun on himself High Point Police Chief Travis Stroud said Saturday’s incident was something he had not experienced in his 28 years on the job. oath and that this is a touching case. He said the things they see are things you can’t ignore. “This is going to be a long-term thing that we have to recover from,” Stroud said. “It’s not something when we close our eyes — that doesn’t go too far and people need to understand that. That’s not, well we’re on the scene and then when we leave the scene it disappears; we have to deal with it like These things, so it hurts us.” Andrews said they deal with scenes and situations like this by going to the Peer Support Leadership Team for help. There, they can talk about events together, communicate with each other, and even get more mental help. “It makes it clear to us that we’re all dealing with the same things, and it helps when you’re talking to someone,” Andrews said. The peer support team also brought in Kim Subban, a local mental health counselor who’s also a former High Point police officer. “One of the first things I tell them is I’ll pop the question what you’re doing, and the only thing you can’t tell me is you’re okay because you and I both know that’s not the case,” Subban said. As well, but things like that affect us, so you’ll hear us a lot say we’re okay because we’re trying to push mental health is not something that gets talked about in this profession, years ago, but they really need to deal with what we’ve seen in order to continue to perform. Their job.” The cop has his role, he knows what to do, but at some point, these two have to come together and the part of us is the part that has to deal with those emotions and those feelings that you have when the accident happens,” Subban said. At the end of the day, they’re really just one blue-line family to support each other, Andrews said.

Several High Point police officers responded to Saturday’s incident in which a High Point father shot and killed his wife and three children before turning the gun on himself.

High Point Police Chief Travis Stroud said Saturday’s incident was something he hadn’t experienced in his 28 years working for the department, and that it was a poignant case. He said the things they see are things you can’t ignore.

“This is going to be a long-term thing, and we have to recover from it,” Stroud said.

“It’s not something when we close our eyes – it doesn’t go away so much and people need to understand that. It’s not like, well we’re on the scene and then when we leave the scene it goes away; we have to deal with this,” said Bonnie Andrews, a lieutenant on the Peer Support Leadership Team. Things like that, so it hurts us.”

Andrews said they deal with scenes and situations like this by going to the Peer Support Leadership Team for help. There, they can talk about accidents together, communicate with each other and even get more mental help.

“It shows that we’re all dealing with the same things, and it helps when you’re talking to someone who’s already experienced it,” Andrews said.

The peer support team also brings in Kim Subban, a local mental health counselor who is also a former High Point police officer.

“One of the first things I tell them is I’m going to pop the question what you’re doing, and the only thing you can’t tell me is you’re okay because you and I both know that’s not the case,” Subban said.

“A lot of times, people think we’re supernatural and we’re not, but things like that affect us, so you’ll often hear us say we’re fine because we’re trying to get through a scene and we’re done, but we really need to deal with what we saw.”

Years ago, Subban said, mental health wasn’t something that was talked about in the profession. Now, they realize that it is crucial in order to continue doing their job.

“The policeman has his role, they know what they have to do, but at some point, these two have to come together and the part of us has to deal with those feelings and those feelings that you’re going through when the accident happens,” Subban said.

At the end of the day, they’re really just one blue-line family to support each other, Andrews said.

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